Sermon Study Guide

 

 

THE BELIEVING REMNANT

Romans: From Guilt to Glory (69) - May 24, 2020 - Pastor Alan Cousins

 

Text:  Romans 11:1-5

Introduction:  Throughout chapters 9-11, Paul is addressing the question of Israel’s rejection of Christ and unbelief in their own Scriptures (O.T.).

In Romans 9, his answer concerned the sovereignty of God, especially His electing love and mercy, in which He has chosen some and passed by others.

In Romans 10, Paul’s answer had to do with man’s responsibility, and the centrality of belief or faith.  Also in this chapter he speaks of Israel’s faithlessness as an example of their willful disobedience to the Word of God that led to their refusal to believe.

Since the main subject of Romans 11 concerns Israel’s part in the redemptive plan of God, what can we find here that will help us in living the Christian life?

 

  •   This chapter reminds us of the importance of a vital relationship with God through Jesus Christ. In religious communities today, including the church, people can go through all manner of efforts to know God, yet in the end still not know Him.

 

  •   Paul also raises the question of whether or not God can be trusted, which is a very important question for a Christian to have an answer to when it comes to believing that God will be faithful to you.

 

  •   Chapter 11 also supplies us with what should be the Christian’s proper attitude toward the Jewish people.  We should pray for their salvation.

 

  •   This chapter is about the big picture or the plan of God. It does us good to realize that it is not all about us, but rather it’s about  God’s plan and His glory.

 

In chapter 11, Paul is going to give us a third answer to the question, but before he does, he states it again in verse 1.  But this time he actually turns the question around.  In chapter 10 he was talking about Israel’s rejection of God, now in chapter 11 he asks has God rejected Israel?

In verse 1, Paul gives us his answer to the question, “Has God rejected Israel?”  Emphatically not.  Then he spends the rest of the chapter demonstrating to us why God’s promises have not failed.

 

I.     PAUL’S PERSONAL SALVATION IS EVIDENCE THAT GOD HAS NOT REJECTED HIS PEOPLE 

      (Rom. 11:1) 

Paul explicitly describes himself as a Jew in three ways: (1) I am an Israelite; (2) I am of the seed of Abraham; and (3) I am from the tribe of Benjamin.

The implicit thing of note has to do with when Paul was Saul of Tarsus.  Humanly speaking, Saul was the person who came the closest in the history of Christianity to extinguishing the church.

His point is, “Look, if I can be saved then anybody can be saved.  If any Jew ought to have been rejected it should have been me.  Yet, not only am I saved, I’m preaching the gospel to the Gentiles.”

 

II.   BELIEVING JEWS ARE ALSO EVIDENCE THAT GOD HAS NOT REJECTED HIS PEOPLE 

      (Rom. 11:2-5; 1 Kings 19:10, 14, & 18)

Paul says that God cannot reject those whom He has set His love on from  eternity past.  Then he proves it to us from Scripture.

God can always be trusted.  When someone believes in the Lord and embraces Him for salvation, it is all due to the gracious choice and mercy of God.